InterClimate Network was launched in 2008 as the brainchild of its then Chair John Davidson OBE, co-founder and Chief Executive of Groundwork UK.

Our current Chairman is James Streeter, who is a sustainable business leader. He is one of the first generation to actively pursue a career in sustainability and is keen to help others to enter this field. James leads our Board of Trustees.

Our projects are managed by a group of freelance Associates, with international and UK experience including programme development and implementation, teaching, and facilitating learning with both teachers and students. We also access valuable input from several expert Advisors and obtain a range of support from a growing team of volunteers.

We operate as a ‘virtual team’, with no expenses for buildings and conduct meetings electronically whenever possible to minimise our environmental footprint. You can read more about the team here.

Trustees

  • James Streeter (Chair)

    James is a sustainable business leader and is one of the first generation to actively pursue a career in sustainability selecting his school and university studies to meet this goal.

    Upon graduating with his MSc in Environmental Management in 1992 he has seen sustainability grow enormously.   His work has taken him to many countries and some incredible environments including the Arctic, the Amazon rainforest and the deserts of the Middle East and North Africa, where he has seen both the vulnerabilities created by climate change and also the strong global commitment to take action. This is an intergenerational challenge and James is keen to inspire the next generation of young people into taking action, including creating opportunities for young people to get work experience and ultimately pursue a career in sustainability.

  • Tamara Inkster-Draper (Secretary)

    Tamara is the Senior Associate in the International Climate Politics Hub team at the European Climate Foundation. In this role, Tamara helps to deliver on the Hub’s mission to increase global climate ambition by helping to coordinate the diverse network of actors around a political strategy.

    Prior to joining ECF in August 2018, Tamara worked for the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership’s (CISL) Policy team. Here her work supported the transition to a sustainable, zero-carbon economy through engagement with business, governments, policymakers, and other experts. Before CISL, Tamara worked at the Australian Government Department of Agriculture on Climate Change Mitigation Policy, and International Trade and Market Access. Tamara holds a PhD from James Cook University, Australia where her research looked at the impacts of climate change on tropical biodiversity.

  • Damian Ryan

    Damian is a Senior Policy Manager at The Climate Group, an international non-profit headquartered in London that works on practical solutions for climate change with leaders from business and government. Damian is responsible for managing much of The Climate Group’s international policy work, including tracking and reporting on the UN climate negotiations. Damian has also covered climate policy issues in the US, China and India, working with colleagues in these countries.

    Prior to joining The Climate Group, Damian worked for New Zealand’s foreign ministry as a policy analyst, covering both the international climate negotiations and the World Trade Organisation ‘Doha’ talks. Damian has an honours degree in applied science and Master’s degree in international relations.

  • Robert Bell

    Robert Bell

    Robert started volunteering for ICN when he retired in 2016 and subsequently became a Trustee.  He had previously been Managing Director of the consultancy Ricardo Energy & Environment, which provided techno-economic and policy support to UK Government, International Agencies, and the private sector.  He chose to volunteer for ICN not only because his technical and operational experience were both relevant, but because he quickly saw how much secondary students attending ICN events learned, and how much the evidently both enjoyed and valued the experience.

  • Simon Trapnell

    After graduation Simon worked in industry before resigning to help establish ‘Nature in Art’, the world’s first museum dedicated to art inspired by nature. He is currently its director. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Simon is passionate about helping young people meaningfully engage with development and environmental issues.

    Having served as a trustee of Global Dimension Trust, and before that a board member of Gloucestershire Development Education Centre, (both part of the heritage of ICN), Simon did not hesitate joining the Board of Interclimate Network to support its innovative and effective programmes.

    Simon is an ambassador for ‘Send a Cow’ and a trustee of Gloucestershire Action for Refugees and Asylum Seekers. He is widely travelled, although those days are now over. With the impact of transport in mind, since 2011 he’s been driving an electric car and averaged no more than one return flight every three years.

Associates

  • Michila Critchley

    Michila is an independent consultant in organisational development, facilitation, research and fund-raising. She has eighteen years’ experience working with not-for-profit organisations internationally and in the UK. Specialist knowledge includes; programme development, facilitation, strategic planning, research and funding and grants and a thorough working knowledge of a national umbrella association for development education.

    Michila currently works with the InterClimate Network as the UK team co-ordinator. During the first 3 years, the team developed a programme that provided face to face support for teachers and practical tools to get started in taking action on local sustainability issues. Key to this has been finding ways to bring ‘critical thinking skills’ and global perspectives to the fore.  We are always looking to new ways to capture young people’s imagination, and have been excited by the responses to the ICN poster resource, ‘Who should we listen to?’, the campaign to generate ‘1000 Voices for Copenhagen’, and model UN Climate Change conferences as dynamic opportunities for young people to experience the major political challenges faced locally and internationally.

  • Cecily Etherington

    Having gained a First Class Degree and MA in Modern History at Leeds University Cecily spent time test driving prototype electric vehicles, teaching in schools and working at WaterAid in the communications and fundraising team.

    In-between this she has travelled across South America, around South East Asia and through Bangladesh into India.

    Cecily became involved with ICN in 2010 where she has developed and Project Manages the Your Green Future programme. This has included securing grants and sponsorship from major corporations, developing workshops and recruiting over 70 organisations to mentor at the events. She also supports ICN’s communications, including the creation of the project blurb books.

  • Helen Garforth

    Helen is a highly experienced facilitator, trainer, researcher and communicator with proven enthusiasm and talent for raising awareness of local, national and global sustainable development issues and motivating for change. She has a passion and a talent for helping to turn discussion into action, and for enabling people, communities and organisations to make a difference.

    Helen’s experience includes being Director of a national and international development education programme, facilitating a global youth action group, international partnership co-ordination, being a trustee on the boards of the Development Education Association, being a school governor, and setting up successful business, Just Ideas.

    Her educational background is in anthropology and international development, with an MA from the School of Oriental and African Studies, and a BA from Queens’ College Cambridge.

    Helen has been involved in ICN since the early stages, playing a key delivery role within the UK team, particularly focusing on developing resources and delivering workshops in schools and with youth groups for the International Climate Challenge and Youth projects. She has particularly enjoyed the Model UN Climate Conferences, and looks forward to developing this methodology further, integrated with other ICN initiatives.

  • Richard Usher

    As an Associate of InterClimate Network Richard has co-facilitated ICN’s Model Climate Conferences, engaged students through outreach work with schools in Reading and London, and done the behind the scenes work making sure events happen! He is also Learning and Evaluation Director at Just Ideas so has contributed to the evaluation of InterClimate Networks projects – assessing the difference that participation makes to young peoples’ attitudes, understanding and actions in relation climate change.

    The powerful participation of new groups of students each year in ICN’s activities, gaining motivation, sharing experience and creating new ideas really drives his involvement with the Climate Voices project. His current portfolio of work beyond ICN includes evaluation for trusts and charities focusing on environmental sustainability, systems change and community development. He loves meeting new people involved in these projects and challenging himself both in learning from others and with a fondness for outdoor adventures involving bikes, trail shoes and wet suits!

Advisors

  • Paul Tyler

    Former Liberal Democrat MP, Lord Paul Tyler is the Honorary President.

    In 2005 Paul retired, after serving for 14 years, as MP for North Cornwall. In addition to his relentless campaigning on a broad range of issues during his time in the House of Commons, Paul also served the Liberal Democrat Front Bench as Chief Whip and most recently as Shadow Leader of the House.

    Paul was subsequently made a working peer and introduced to the House of Lords. He is now Liberal Democrat spokesman in the Lords on constitutional reform issues, and served on the 2006 Joint Committee on Conventions, which examined and set out the relationship between the House of Lords and the House of Commons.

    Paul and his wife, Nicky now live in a recently built sustainable, largely energy self-sufficient home in Nicky’s native Gloucestershire.

  • Dale Williams

    Dale is a partner in the corporate team of BPE solicitors, which means he acquires of, disposes of and restructures companies and other business structures. He acts for wide range of both private and public companies and has a specialism in renewable technologies, a subject close to his heart. Originally from North Wales he moved to England in 1988 settling in Cheltenham in 1998 then joining BPE’s Cheltenham office in February 2013, so he finally works in the town where he lives and can walk to work most days. Outside of law Dale is a passionate Skier and Snowboarder and a Trustee of The Children’s Family Trust.

  • Kirsty Schneeberger

    Kirsty Schneeberger MBE is Head of Strategic Partnerships at ClientEarth, the Environmental Law Charity. Her work has always been driven by a passion and desire to fight climate change and use the law to support the stable transition to a renewable economy.

    Whilst Kirsty does not practise, she was called to the Bar in 2015. She has recently been appointed Chair of the UK Environmental Law Association, after serving on the Council for eight years. She is a Trustee of the Environmental Law Foundation and was honoured as an MBE for Services to Environmental Conservation in 2010.

    Kirsty worked for the UNFCCC Executive Secretary’s Office for COP21 that delivered the Paris Agreement. She believes that ICN is important because it supports the efforts of young people to better understand the UN system and empowers them to think about the role they can play in bringing about change to tackle climate change.

  • Lucy Stone

    Lucy’s work focuses on the social impacts and responses to climate change. She has been a long term advocate for enabling the voice of children in climate policy – nationally and internationally. Ensuring young people are equipped with skills and support to thrive in a changing climate is something she believes is important both as a climate professional as well as a mother.

    At UNICEF UK Lucy helped develop and deliver a global children’s forum on climate change during the Copenhagen UN climate negotiations. She helped establish the ‘children in a changing climate’ coalition of children’s organisations (Save the Children, Plan, UNICEF and others), providing research on the role of children in child-sensitive climate programmes and policy. Recently she has developed campaigns on the impact on children of air pollution, mobilising parents in cities. Her role now involves strategy for a range of organisations from the UN, to private sector, foundations and NGOs.

Volunteers

  • Ruben Brooke

    Ruben Brooke

    I became involved with ICN in 2017. Attending the 2017 Reading climate conference, I was inspired by ICN’s approach when developing a climate diplomacy-themed project in challenging schools with another charity. Ever since that day I have been convinced that ICN’s approach is the best way to get young people thinking about climate change as a global problem while offering them pathways to local action.

    I’ve been interested in environmental issues since I was at school, having spent lots of my childhood outdoors growing up in Somerset and Dorset. My educational background is in the humanities. I graduated from New College of the Humanities with a degree in Philosophy with English in 2019 to pursue an MSc in Environmental Policy and Governance from the University of Bristol.

  • Will Henley

    Will is a sustainability communications specialist and Head of Communications for the International Hydropower Association. He has worked in journalism, international development, government, and energy, finance and infrastructure sectors.

    As a climate advocate, Will is a strong supporter of ICN’s mission to inspire young people to become active citizens and leaders in sustainable development. He has represented both IHA and The Commonwealth at the United Nations climate conference (COP). He previously wrote about sustainable business for The Guardian and co-founded a youth website YourCommonwealth.org

    In his early career, Will worked as a ministerial research assistant at the Home Office and also for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) in Kosovo and Macedonia. He holds a first-class degree in international relations and a post-graduate diploma in journalism. He is also a keen kayaker and river user.

  • Jenny Mant

    Jenny Mant started her professional life as a physics teacher. This was followed, as a university lecturer, by extensive educational research and teacher training. Before retiring she worked for the Institute of Physics on projects promoting physics education in schools, and specifically those which explored how to encourage girls into physics.

    She has recently volunteered for ICN because she thinks it is vital for young people to understand all aspects of climate change, particularly the science involved, and for them to be educated to participate in society and learn how to take action. The work ICN does with young people is inspiring and she is keen to support it further.

  • Helen Dewhurst

    Helen is a Corporate Sustainability Associate at BloombergNEF. She previously worked in sustainable procurement at Accenture, and holds a BA in geography from the University of Cambridge.

    Helen’s present role involves examining how companies procure renewable energy, and the efforts being made by corporate and industrial consumers to manage their resources more sustainably with a focus on carbon reduction. Helen examines how policies and renewable energy economics interact to influence corporate renewable purchasing decisions, and builds datasets that track the progress of corporate environmental commitments.

    Helen is excited to be part of ICN. She believes it is vital for the next generation to learn how they can tackle climate change. ICN provides the inspiration and knowledge teenagers need to influence decisions made by governments, companies and civil society.

    Growing up over a decade ago, options to pursue a career in sustainability weren’t clear. The opportunity to take part in ICN events would have been very welcome.